My first meta post

So much of my learning is meta. Or rather, the reporting of my learning is meta.

This post is in answer to a set of questions I have been asked at the end of week 1 of my course.

First of all a little shout-out to my OneNote journal. As I continue my studies, I am always very proud of the progression of my notebook. In my analogue note-taking days, I was proud of those notes too, by the way… so I probably would have treated you all to a photo of my notes. Now I show you a screenshot….

OneNote pride

What ideas have you been looking at and can you relate?

Amongst other things, we have been looking at MOOCs. I love reading MOOC research, no idea why! I find it interesting to read how learners engage with them, why the learners are engaged, what content is used and, most importantly, the pedagogies that underpin the learning design.

I very much enjoyed the seminar by Mike Sharples. It took me longer than the suggested hour, I think more like 2 hours. This was because I paused to make notes/take screenshots. It was very engaging and a fine example of how to host an engaging online seminar.

I also liked that the seminar was recorded in 2018 live (with questions from participants) and then posted in the course for later cohorts to watch. Excellent reuse of resources.

Sharples discussed the pedagogies that underpin FutureLearn and the difference beween the MOOCs designed for FutureLearn (social/networked and based on Human Learning as Conversations), vs MOOCs designed for platforms like Coursera and Khan Academy (based on the transmission model popularised by the 1970s OU). Though I would add here, that I know that there many Coursera MOOCS that do not depend on transmission… the style depends on who has designed the course.

Sharples described a feature in FutureLearn that enables learners to comment on individual activities, as opposed to in one forum. This is to encourage conversations around a specific concept. Though he mentioned that these activities can get thousands of posts which is overwhelming for many… So thought needs to be put into how that can be managed.

Was what I learned relevant to my professional practice?

I design courses for a living so yes! Lots more food for thought here.

I love the idea of having a conversation around a learning activity rather than a forum. As each study year passes, I like my OU forum less and less. I find it clunky and cumbersome. Also, the questions asked lend themselves to long posts that frankly, I have no motivation to read most of the time.


For social learning I love Twitter, I will get back to you on how I find blogging 😉 I am enjoying it now but it is a commitment.

Has anything you’ve studied prompted you to try something new?

This is the meta bit…

I am noticing that these specific types of open questions are prompting me to remind myself about the week’s learning, some nice consolidation being encouraged here.

I am trying to build up a bank of nice open questions for my own courses. Questions for private and public reflection. This very activity is showing me that it is very important to ask students to reflect on a block of time and not just on a specific question for one particular concept or learning outcome. Reflecting on a block of time enourages student direct learning AND human learning as conversations.

Featured

Hello world!

Would this even be a website if my first post wasn’t called “Hello world!”? Here’s a photo of a cat 😉

fred

I aim to make this blog as jargon-free as possible, as overly-wordy text is one of my pet hates.

About me

I am about to start the final year of my masters course- MA in Online and Distance Education (MA ODE) at the Open University. Sadly this course is being discontinued- I may blog about that in the future.

I have come far!

grand canyon path

A year ago, I wouldn’t have even understood the “hello world” joke I just made.

I recently found some notes I wrote back in 2016 (my first year on the course), and I wrote “TEL= technology enhanced learning”. I probably would have considered “TEL” to be jargon, I also remember bristling at terms like “asynchronous” and “pedagogy” and I now use them all the time.

Food for thought though.

A year from now, will these posts be full of acronyms, backronyms, intialisms and words that only those involved with ed tech use?

My pledge for this blog

As I progress through the course, I will force myself to write posts here of at least 500-1000 words in length based on the week’s material. I have been inspired to do this by a colleague, who is studying on a similar course at a different university. She has to write 3 blog posts a week. I think this is a good idea, and am trying out myself -“dog-fooding” as one of my very charming colleagues would would it (hello Stephen ;P).

I pledge to keep this blog public, to ensure that my posts are ordered and make sense. Well that’s the idea anyway.

I suspect I will maintain my private journal too, for when I want to rant about something, as my rants are usually sweary and incoherent 😉

I also pledge to make this blog as accessible as possible, and free of copyright theft.

Until next time!